Flower Photography – English Rose

One of the easiest projects in the Photographing Flowers class with Harold Davis is to take a picture of a rose straight on. As long as you have a light box, it is quite easy to set up the light box with two lights from both sides. Here’s the original image of the rose straight from the camera. Among hundreds of David Austin roses, Abraham Darby is my favorite. Despite my neglect, the bush is vigorous with heavy flowering in the spring and sporadic flowering throughout the year. The flowers are large, open, very fragrant, and tinted with the most romantic shade of apricot.

Original image of the English rose Abraham Darby.

Original image of the English rose Abraham Darby.

And here’s the cropped and slightly enhanced photo from Lightroom. Taken on the Nikon D3100 and Tamron 60mm f.2 lens at f/8, 1 second, ISO 200.

The soft contrasts and layers of petals on the English rose Abraham Darby.

The soft contrasts and layers of petals on the English rose Abraham Darby.

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About knottyewe

Blogging about knitting, making yarn, and making socks.
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One Response to Flower Photography – English Rose

  1. Lynda Bass says:

    Hi Loan, Abraham Darby is one of my favorite roses, as well. I left a bush at my other house when I moved, and I killed one here. But as I am looking forward to moving again, I look forward to planting another one at my forever house. It is, indeed, a wonderful rose. So are St. Cecilia, Grus An Achen, Dainty Bess, and Eden the climber, though it blooms only one time, heavily. They are all pink to apricot color range. I am loving your photos. Cropping does so much for the viewer and really focuses on what we want them to look at. I’m not doing much cranking, and still have some socks left to dye. I have been working on a weaving guild overshot project. Weaving is done, now to correct and prepare the pieces, almost done with that, as well. I am also spinning some Leicester after carding with nylon to see if I can make some crankable sock yarn. Have fun, take care, Lynda

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